Kerkvliet earns second-straight bid to World finals, Figueroa to join in the hunt for gold

ZAGREB, Croatia – On the first day of the 2018 Cadet World Championships in Zagreb, Croatia, the U.S. put two wrestlers into tomorrow’s gold-medal finals and have one athlete in the hunt for bronze.

Heading to the World finals are Daniel Greg Kerkvliet at 110 kg and Richard Figueroa at 55 kg, while Abe Assad was pulled into repechage at 80 kg.

“I’d say overall the team’s performance has been solid,” Cadet World coach Lee Pritts said. “I don’t think that we’ve performed up to our team’s ability yet. I remember this time last year after the first round, we were thinking, ‘Oh we’re in trouble,’ but Kevin Jackson brought the team in, had a conversation, and next thing you know, we were working together as a unit. We did the same thing this and said ‘You have to go take these wins. No one is going to give them to you.’” Continue reading

A love affair with wrestling: Farmington’s Venz excels at the highest levels

Wrestling has been a significant part of Taylor Venz’s life since he was a young kid, starting when he was first exposed to the sport early on in life. Since then, Venz’s love for wrestling has only increased year by year and led him to where he is today—a standout athlete on the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers’ wrestling team. This past season, Venz was named an All-American, qualified for the NCAA Championships where he took fourth at 184 pounds and was named the Huskers’ Most Valuable Wrestler.

“I started when I was in kindergarten and I loved it,” he said. “Ever since it’s been my favorite sport. I played other sports but wrestling was my favorite and by the time I got to high school it was the only sport I played.”

Today, athletes face intense pressure to specialize in one sport in order to improve and potentially earn a collegiate scholarship, while at the same time being told that they have to play multiple sports. For Venz, who dabbled in different sports up until high school, it was all about his love for wrestling.

“In middle school I did track, but I would have to miss it for freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, so I chose wrestling over the other sports if they were at the same time,” he said. “It was an easy choice, too. I know other sports are good for you, but for me I would rather wrestle than do anything else so it was an easy choice for me.” Continue reading at www.farmingtonindependent.com

Mitch McKee looks for revenge with U23 Team USA

Gophers Sophomore Mitch McKee is looking to make the most of his spot on the U23 Team USA roster.

MINNEAPOLIS – In this dungeon of a gym, where he spends his time perfecting these moves, Gophers Sophomore Mitch McKee is done wrestling with demons of his past.

“I think in the tough times is when you remember he’s not there the most,” says Gopher wrestler Mitch McKee.

He speaks of his father, Steve, who passed away in 2014. View/continue reading at www.kare11.com

Iowa Hawkeye wrestler Sam Stoll lied to police about gunshot to knee, report says

Police are charging University of Iowa wrestler Sam Stoll after they say he lied to law enforcement about the gunshot wound he sustained earlier this month.

Stoll told police he lied to protect the friend who shot him, according to a police complaint from the Iowa City Police Department.

From the emergency room on June 19, Stoll initially told police that he shot himself in the knee while sitting inside his own garage, according to a police report. Upon investigating, officers determined that the shooting did not take place at Stoll’s residence.

When officers confronted Stoll again, the wrestler’s story changed, according to the report. Stoll reportedly redacted his initial statement and told police that he was shot while playing a prank on a friend at that friend’s Iowa City home. Continue reading at www.press-citizen.com