Shilson announced as National Tricia Saunders High School Excellence Award Winner

STILLWATER, Okla. – The National Wrestling Hall of Fame on Wednesday announced that Emily Shilson of North Oaks, Minnesota, is the 2019 national winner of the Tricia Saunders High School Excellence Award (TSHSEA).

Shilson will be presented with her award during the 43rd Annual Honors Weekend at the National Wrestling Hall of Fame & Museum on May 31 and June 1 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. For information on Honors Weekend, visit nwhof.ticketleap.com or telephone (405) 377-5243.

“I am both humbled and honored to be chosen from this fantastic group of female student-athletes for the 2019 Tricia Saunders High School Excellence Award,” said Shilson. “I have always admired Tricia for her great success as a competitor in addition to her willingness to continue to give back to the sport. To receive the award that is named after her is incredible. I would also like to thank the National Wrestling HOF for making this opportunity possible.”

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Tricia Saunders High School Excellence Award regional, state winners announced

Emily Shilson recognized as Minnesota and Midwest Region winner

STILLWATER — The National Wrestling Hall of Fame has announced the state and regional winners of the Tricia Saunders High School Excellence Award (TSHSEA).

The award recognizes and celebrates the nation’s most outstanding high school senior female wrestlers for their excellence in wrestling, scholastic achievement, citizenship, and community service.

Regional winners are selected from state winners, and the national winner will be chosen from the regional winners.

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Q & A with Emily Shilson, Minnesota’s best female wrestler, who’s finally done wrestling boys

Emily Shilson has been wrestling against boys, and usually winning, for about a decade. But that’s over, now that she has completed her senior season in high school.

Shilson looks ahead to wrestling against women at one of the 33 colleges that offer the sport. She hasn’t picked one yet. She will continue to pursue her ultimate goal — the Olympics. Already, she is a 2018 Cadet World Champion and 2017 silver medalist, and a 2018 Youth Olympic Games Champion.

Shilson wrestled for Centennial for four seasons and Mounds View her senior year, all at 106 pounds. She qualified for the state tournament the last three years, as a section runner-up and two-time section champion.

She was never able to win a match at state, in three individual tournaments and two team tournaments, but posted a 139-64 career record, including 88-20 the last three. Continue reading at presspubs.com

McNiff’s Riffs: MN has a world champion wrestler, and she’s a beast

Tim McNiff catches up with 17-year-old world champion wrestler Emily Shilson.

Okay… don’t come at me because I just called a 17-year-old girl a “beast,” It’s cool. At least, I think it is.

As I explained to Emily Shilson, who just last week became the first girl from the U.S. to win a world championship since 2015 (teammate Macey Kilty from Wisconsin also won a world title the very next day), I meant it as nothing but a compliment, because Emily Shilson eats, drinks, lifts, sweats, dreams and breathes everything about wrestling.

“I can’t imagine doing any other sport. It just wouldn’t be the same,” says Emily. “I love every minute of wrestling. Whether it’s hard or not, it’s just fun and sometimes the funnest parts are the hard parts.” Continue reading

Minnesota’s best girls’ wrestler just wants to be a wrestler

At first glance, little appears exceptional about Centennial junior Emily Shilson as she prepares for a wrestling match, except that, though she competes at 106 pounds, the lightest weight, she seems on the smallish side.

Ponytail tucked under a black skull cap and covered by standard headgear, she’s constantly in motion, bouncing on the balls of her feet, stretching, running a few quick sprints to break a sweat. Just another wrestler warming up.

But then you see the glare. It’s at once a look of steely determination and intense focus, her mind solely on the task in front of her. It’s impossible to ignore, even though it’s directed mostly inwardly, where she’s lost in thought and preparation and intent. For the next 6 minutes, Shilson’s entire world is the 38-foot-by-38-foot wrestling mat.

“Some people call it intensity,” said her father, mentor and coach, Chad. “We call it focus.” Continue reading at www.startribune.com