J Robinson and Saint Thomas Academy Host New Youth Wrestling Tournament Preceding MNUSA State Tournament

Proceeds from tournament for PreK- 8th graders will benefit United Heroes League

MINNEAPOLIS/MENDOTA HEIGHTS, Minn – J Robinson, founder of JROB Intensive Wrestling Camps and three-time NCAA National Champion wrestling coach, and all-boys, college-preparatory Saint Thomas Academy, are partnering to host the inaugural J Robinson Wrestling Classic on Sunday, March 4, the final tournament before the MNUSA State Youth Wrestling Tournament, March 9-11, in Rochester, Minn. The tournament is open to boys and girls in PreK through 8th grades, with all proceeds benefitting Minnesota-based United Heroes League (UHL), a charity that makes it financially possible for children in military families to participate in and experience athletic competition.

Robinson, a former Army Ranger and Vietnam veteran, and Saint Thomas Academy see the tournament as an opportunity to contribute to the growth of wrestling in Minnesota and encourage athletes to further their athletic potential. “Providing young wrestlers with access to great tournaments is the best way to help them stay involved in the sport long-term,” Robinson said. “The success of our sport depends on it, and I am honored to partner with such a respected school as Saint Thomas Academy to help grow the sport of wrestling.”

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On The Mat: National championship coach and Olympian J Robinson

J Robinson, 1972 Greco-Roman Olympian and iconic Minnesota head wrestling coach, goes “On the Mat” on Wednesday, August 2.

“On the Mat” is a presentation of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum. The show can be heard live on the Internet at 1650thefan.com or locally in Northeast Iowa each Wednesday at 5 p.m. Central on AM 1650, The Fan.

 

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28 days that will change your life

J Robinson Intensive Wrestling Camps

By Brian Jerzak

The temperature was over ninety degrees in late July. Wrestlers from around the country were engaged in one-on-one live wrestling. Not more than ten minutes passed and everyone on the mat was drenched in sweat, but they pressed on. At 15 minutes the whistle blew, the action stopped and each wrestler found his individually labeled water bottle for a two minute water break. After the two minute break the whistle blew again and the paired off wrestlers began again, this time for ten minutes. The intensity of the wrestling didn’t slow down as time went on. None of the wrestlers wanted to be responsible for making the group do 50 yard bear crawls or push-ups because he was not pulling his weight. Ten physically draining minutes pass and the whistle blows again. Two minutes of water and rest before the next whistle. Five minutes, break, five minutes, break, ten minutes, break, and finally one more grueling 15 minute live wrestling session.

After the final 15 minute session, the camp leader, who had been observing the action from the side, gathers up the sweat drenched wrestlers. He summarizes an earlier session the wrestlers had with a group of Navy SEALS giving them the collective group results of the swimming test the SEALS put them through. He then moves on to the final day’s workouts. He asked the wrestlers how many of them are worried about the 15 mile run that laid ahead of them the next and last day of the camp. About half of the wrestlers raised their hands. Then he asked how many of them think they can run seven and a half miles. Every one of the wrestlers’ hands went up. “All you have to do then,” the coach said, “is turn around and run back.”

I asked Ed Henry, a wrestler from Michigan who was preparing for his senior year of high school and was back for his third straight year at the camp, why he puts himself through this. I mentioned there must be a hundred wrestling camps he could choose, why choose this camp?

“Here you have no distractions. It is all about wrestling. Before my first year coming here, I was 18-32. After coming here one year I was 32-18. It (his big turn around) was all because of this camp. It gave me the confidence I needed to compete against the top guys. After wrestling with (among others) Cole Konrad and Rulan Gardner, I knew I could handle any wrestling situation I would get into.”

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